FAQ's: Your Questions, Answered

WHAT DOES FIGURE 1 / FIGURE 6 / FIGURE 66 (PULL, PUSH OR PARALLEL ARM) MEAN?

Figure 1 / Pull Side - Hinge knuckle side of door
Figure 1 fitting is the most common type for overhead door closers. When fitting in this configuration the closer body is fixed to the hinge knuckle side of the door (pull side) and the arm is attached to the frame.

Figure 6 / Push Side - Opposite hinge knuckle side of door 
With fitting in figure 6 the body of the door closer is attached to the frame with the arm fixed to the door. The closer body is fitted onto the opposite side of the door to Figure 1 (figure 6 is the push side of the door). Figure 6 application is used when fitting a closer to an outward opening external door. This ensures that the closer body is fitted internally and not exposed to the weather.

Figure 66 or parallel arm / Push Side – Opposite hinge side of door
Figure 66 application of a door closer is also suitable for use on outward opening doors. The closer body is fitted to the door and the arm fixed to the frame using a parallel arm bracket.  In figure 66 configuration the closer is fitted to the push side of the door as per figure 6 application.

WHY DO I NEED A DOOR CLOSER?

A door closer is an essential item that will ensure safety and security, current legislation dictates that door closers must be fitted to fire control doors to assist in the containment of smoke and flames in an emergency situation. Some form of controlled door closing device should also be used when access control is fitted to enhance the security of your building.

WHAT IS THE DIFFERENCE BETWEEN AN ELECTROMAGNETIC DOOR CLOSER AND A STANDARD DOOR CLOSER?

An electromagnetic door closer will allow a door to be held open or to free swing as if no closer were fitted. Some models are wired directly into the fire alarm system so in the event of a fire the closer will release from hold open and the door will automatically shut, preventing the spread of fire and smoke.
A door closer can be fitted with a manual hold open device but these should not be fitted to fire control doors.
A standard door closer will close a door once opened but has no link to the fire alarm system. If fire control doors are required to be held open on a regular basis, due to high traffic flow or the easy movement of items/ goods, then an electromagnetic door closer should be used. If the doors will be in the closed position for the majority of their use then a standard, non-EMF closer, would be sufficient.

SHOULD A HOLD OPEN MAGNET BE FITTED ON THE SAME PLANE AS THE DOOR CLOSER?

It should. This is because you want to avoid the door twisting out of shape due to the overhead door closer and floor-mounted magnet pulling in opposite directions across the diagonal height of the door. The twisting takes time to happen, but crucially, can mean the door will not close snuggly in to the frame therefore reducing its effectiveness as a fire door.

WHAT IS MEANT BY A VOLTAGE DROP FROM A POWER SUPPLY?

Voltage drop is measured by the length of the run from your power supply to the unit and the wire gauge used. Most electricians will be aware of this and will be able to select the correct wire gauge for the job in hand, but if you need help, tables can be found online detailing wire gauge, distance and the resulting voltage drop you can expect. Door Controls Direct can help you select a good quality PSU with individual terminals capable of accepting lower gauge (or thicker) wires.

MY CLIENT DOESN’T WANT PUSH BUTTON LOCKS, WHAT OTHER OPTIONS ARE THERE?

In recent years proximity readers have become increasingly popular due to the wide choice of solutions available and their ease of use by installers, building owners and end users. If proximity access isn’t the ideal system for your application swipe card and electronic push button key pad locks are a good alternative for restricting access. Door Controls Direct stocks a range of access methods suitable for standalone single door, multiple door and multiple user systems.

IS THERE A PARTICULAR KIND OF ACCESS CONTROL LOCKING SYSTEM I SHOULD GO FOR?

An electric strike is a basic and effective type of locking device for an access control door. If your access control solution is required to be integrated with a fire alarm system then an electric lock, magnetic lock or solenoid operated lock maybe required. These types of locking devices have the option to release to fail safe to ensure the door can be opened without hindrance, or to fail secure (locked) in areas where greater levels of security are required over and above ease of egress from an area.

CAN I INCLUDE DOOR AUTOMATION IN AN ACCESS CONTROL SYSTEM?

Yes! It is possible to have an automated door that is integrated with an access control solution. Situations where these are used are shop entrance doors, operated by motion detectors or push buttons. This solution for automation can be integrated with proximity access control and keypad locks. Door Controls Door direct can offer advice on door automation to suit your particular environment.

IF FITTING AN ELECTROMAGNETIC LOCK TO A FIRE DOOR, DOES THE LOCK NEED FIRE TEST EVIDENCE TO PROVE IT IS SUITABLE?

Yes, the lock should be tested to the level of fire rating of the door e.g. FD30 (half hour), FD60 (1 hour).

WHAT'S THE DIFFERENCE BETWEEN A LOW ENERGY DOOR OPERATOR AND FULLY AUTOMATIC ONE?

A low energy device operates on an ‘on-demand’ basis, generally where a conventional door closer cannot be used due to accessibility issues, they are designed to operate slowly using minimal force. Quite often, these devices are push button operated. Fully automatic on the other hand, are used where footfall is greater. They operate speedily and continuously. Safety devices are usually used in these situations.

Do you accept returns?

Yes we do, you can find out more about our returns process by visiting our dedicated Returns page here.